5 things I love on the internet this week

No time for quasi-intellectual introductions, so  here’s some cool stuff I’ve seen on the internet recently:

How to fail at content marketing, starring Klout

Content Marketing is tough.  I know.  We all have some blogposts out there that we wish we could take back, but the internet never forgets.  More often than not, we find ourselves on an arbitrary deadline, trying to feed the monkey, cranking out something that we know isn’t great, but maybe will end up simply as the least popular content that week.

Sometimes, a jerk like me notices when a company screws up.  So here’s how to fail at Content Marketing, starring Klout.

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kuaidi and didi merger — a new moment in Chinese infrastructure

On saturday Kuaidi dache announced that they had agreed to merge with their biggest / bigger rival, Didi dache. Techinasia has a good write up about it, but I took issue with the suggestion that the merger has something to do with Uber.  I went on a twitter rampage about the deal, and Jon Russell told me to write it up (he already has a piece on techcrunch about the merger that has all the details).  I often confuse more words with a better argument, so I’ll just try to channel the twitter brevity but expand my point.  Here goes:

Continue reading kuaidi and didi merger — a new moment in Chinese infrastructure

Nomore.org may be more of a sham than I even imagined

Earlier this week I posted about a really powerful Super Bowl commercial, because it came from an interesting source and seemed to represent a halting, half-assed but nevertheless an attempt from the NFL to, y’know, stop being a disgrace.  Well, shit.

It’s a triumph of advertising doublespeak, created to color-code another month and diversify “cause-themed” product lines from major brands.  Nomore.org is not, in any way I can understand, designed to impact to the people they offer to protect and support.  It’s advertising gone wrong in so many fundamental ways.  There’s a startling lack of empathy for victims of domestic violence in the way Nomore.org describes itself, its purpose and mission.  It sounds a bit sociopathic, honestly.

The most damning statement is actually from the top comment, and it is SPOT ON:

And what’s the benefit of the NFL going with a cipher of a branding scheme, rather than with an actual nonprofit that does work or raises money? Seems pretty obvious: No More allows the NFL almost complete freedom to brand itself as deeply invested in women’s issues.

To the NFL—even in this thing that seemed impossible to fuck up—everything is merely image.

What. The. Fuck.   Doesn’t take away from the ad itself — it’s good, powerful work — but those who got it on air appear to be questionably motivated, at best.

Super bowl ads: One of the most powerful ads came from Reddit

While 2015 super bowl ads were, as always, a mix of serious and funny, good and bad, and, of course inspiring the best and worse reactions out of people, I hope we can all agree that NoMore.Org‘s ad was a powerful piece of work.

The spot was inspired by an Ask Reddit thread asking for stories from 911 operators.  Just goes to show, the most powerful stories are often straight from real-life and not from “storytellers“.

As much as I love the backstory of how this piece came to life, I have to mention that the NFL co-sponsored this ad.  We can’t  forget the NFL’s absolutely horrific record on domestic violence — a long-time problem, not just a 2014 scandal, nor let them off the hook simply for work like this.   Hats off to Grey, who made the spot, but as AdAge notes, the NFL could only manage to donate half of the “time” to show the spot — the other half was came out of Grey’s pocket.  Come on, NFL..

 

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