5 things I love on the internet, week of june 15th

  1. Volkswagen New Zealand just … well just click. It’s really good.
  2. The ad nerds at D&AD built an ad blocker, but instead of simply blocking the ads, they insert inspirational and excellent ads from their curated list of the ‘best of the best’.
  3. Buzzfeed’s Data team thinks they’ve cracked social sharing analytics. It’s a highly technical, but fascinating read.
  4. Google’s Advanced Tech and Projects team (ATAP) continue to create amazing things: Project Soli is an interaction sensor that could change everything, and Project Jacquard may be the first scalable advance in smart textiles and clothing. Why’d I say scalable? They already have apartnership with Levi’s.
  5. In China, rappers are dropping tracks criticizing authorities for cracking down on uber. It’s a pretty hot track

5 things I love on the internet this week

No time for quasi-intellectual introductions, so  here’s some cool stuff I’ve seen on the internet recently:

How to fail at content marketing, starring Klout

Content Marketing is tough.  I know.  We all have some blogposts out there that we wish we could take back, but the internet never forgets.  More often than not, we find ourselves on an arbitrary deadline, trying to feed the monkey, cranking out something that we know isn’t great, but maybe will end up simply as the least popular content that week.

Sometimes, a jerk like me notices when a company screws up.  So here’s how to fail at Content Marketing, starring Klout.

Continue reading How to fail at content marketing, starring Klout

kuaidi and didi merger — a new moment in Chinese infrastructure

On saturday Kuaidi dache announced that they had agreed to merge with their biggest / bigger rival, Didi dache. Techinasia has a good write up about it, but I took issue with the suggestion that the merger has something to do with Uber.  I went on a twitter rampage about the deal, and Jon Russell told me to write it up (he already has a piece on techcrunch about the merger that has all the details).  I often confuse more words with a better argument, so I’ll just try to channel the twitter brevity but expand my point.  Here goes:

Continue reading kuaidi and didi merger — a new moment in Chinese infrastructure

Nomore.org may be more of a sham than I even imagined

Earlier this week I posted about a really powerful Super Bowl commercial, because it came from an interesting source and seemed to represent a halting, half-assed but nevertheless an attempt from the NFL to, y’know, stop being a disgrace.  Well, shit.

It’s a triumph of advertising doublespeak, created to color-code another month and diversify “cause-themed” product lines from major brands.  Nomore.org is not, in any way I can understand, designed to impact to the people they offer to protect and support.  It’s advertising gone wrong in so many fundamental ways.  There’s a startling lack of empathy for victims of domestic violence in the way Nomore.org describes itself, its purpose and mission.  It sounds a bit sociopathic, honestly.

The most damning statement is actually from the top comment, and it is SPOT ON:

And what’s the benefit of the NFL going with a cipher of a branding scheme, rather than with an actual nonprofit that does work or raises money? Seems pretty obvious: No More allows the NFL almost complete freedom to brand itself as deeply invested in women’s issues.

To the NFL—even in this thing that seemed impossible to fuck up—everything is merely image.

What. The. Fuck.   Doesn’t take away from the ad itself — it’s good, powerful work — but those who got it on air appear to be questionably motivated, at best.

Since 2005, I must be confused.